hrcak mascot   Srce   HID

Original scientific paper
https://doi.org/10.21857/94kl4cxpqm

A Morphology of Medieval Notations in the Optical Neume Recognition Project

Kate Helsen ; Don Wright Faculty of Music, London, Ontario, Kanada
Inga Behrendt ; Hochschule für Kirchenmusik der Diözese Rottenburg-Stuttgart, Rottenburg, Germany
Jennifer Bain ; Fountain School of Performing Arts Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

Fulltext: english, pdf (504 KB) pages 241-266 downloads: 563* cite
APA 6th Edition
Helsen, K., Behrendt, I. & Bain, J. (2017). A Morphology of Medieval Notations in the Optical Neume Recognition Project. Arti musices, 48 (2), 241-266. https://doi.org/10.21857/94kl4cxpqm
MLA 8th Edition
Helsen, Kate, et al. "A Morphology of Medieval Notations in the Optical Neume Recognition Project." Arti musices, vol. 48, no. 2, 2017, pp. 241-266. https://doi.org/10.21857/94kl4cxpqm. Accessed 13 Jul. 2020.
Chicago 17th Edition
Helsen, Kate, Inga Behrendt and Jennifer Bain. "A Morphology of Medieval Notations in the Optical Neume Recognition Project." Arti musices 48, no. 2 (2017): 241-266. https://doi.org/10.21857/94kl4cxpqm
Harvard
Helsen, K., Behrendt, I., and Bain, J. (2017). 'A Morphology of Medieval Notations in the Optical Neume Recognition Project', Arti musices, 48(2), pp. 241-266. https://doi.org/10.21857/94kl4cxpqm
Vancouver
Helsen K, Behrendt I, Bain J. A Morphology of Medieval Notations in the Optical Neume Recognition Project. Arti musices [Internet]. 2017 [cited 2020 July 13];48(2):241-266. https://doi.org/10.21857/94kl4cxpqm
IEEE
K. Helsen, I. Behrendt and J. Bain, "A Morphology of Medieval Notations in the Optical Neume Recognition Project", Arti musices, vol.48, no. 2, pp. 241-266, 2017. [Online]. https://doi.org/10.21857/94kl4cxpqm

Abstracts
The study of medieval notations depends on effective categorization of individual signs in order to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of their musical meaning. Over the past century, chant scholars have developed several kinds of neume tables which arrange and contextualize neumes either according to graphical type, chronology, or scribal tradition. Some neume tables contain longer strings of neumes that link certain notation conventions with performance traditions. The course of neume table development reads like a history of the study of early notations, itself, and reveals the evolving interests and pursuits of the scholars who created them. It also sets the stage for the latest use of the neume table as a reference for document analysis software applied to digital images of medieval manuscripts. Now, instead of presenting a static list of discrete signs, the neume table can be understood as a reflection of the notational variety and nuance of the hundreds of thousands of neumes contained in every book of liturgical chant. On this scale, neume tables help scholars to understand the use of medieval neumes in the same way a linguist understands the morphology of words. This article presents the principles on which this new kind of neume table has been developed and suggests the ways in which this new way of thinking might inform the discipline in the future.

Keywords
neume table; morphology of medieval notation; adiastematic notation; medieval manuscripts; music encoding intiative – MEI; optical music recognition – OMR; Antiphonar Hartker from St. Gall Sang. Cod. 390 / 391, liturgical books in Latin

Hrčak ID: 192635

URI
https://hrcak.srce.hr/192635

[croatian]

Visits: 700 *