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Original scientific paper
https://doi.org/10.29162/ANAFORA.v4i2.8

Adapting the Adapted: The Black Rapist Myth in E.R. Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes and Its Film Adaptations

Biljana Oklopčić   ORCID icon orcid.org/0000-0001-9949-6293 ; Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia

Fulltext: english, pdf (206 KB) pages 313-330 downloads: 1.086* cite
APA 6th Edition
Oklopčić, B. (2017). Adapting the Adapted: The Black Rapist Myth in E.R. Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes and Its Film Adaptations. Anafora, 4 (2), 313-330. https://doi.org/10.29162/ANAFORA.v4i2.8
MLA 8th Edition
Oklopčić, Biljana. "Adapting the Adapted: The Black Rapist Myth in E.R. Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes and Its Film Adaptations." Anafora, vol. 4, no. 2, 2017, pp. 313-330. https://doi.org/10.29162/ANAFORA.v4i2.8. Accessed 26 Nov. 2020.
Chicago 17th Edition
Oklopčić, Biljana. "Adapting the Adapted: The Black Rapist Myth in E.R. Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes and Its Film Adaptations." Anafora 4, no. 2 (2017): 313-330. https://doi.org/10.29162/ANAFORA.v4i2.8
Harvard
Oklopčić, B. (2017). 'Adapting the Adapted: The Black Rapist Myth in E.R. Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes and Its Film Adaptations', Anafora, 4(2), pp. 313-330. https://doi.org/10.29162/ANAFORA.v4i2.8
Vancouver
Oklopčić B. Adapting the Adapted: The Black Rapist Myth in E.R. Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes and Its Film Adaptations. Anafora [Internet]. 2017 [cited 2020 November 26];4(2):313-330. https://doi.org/10.29162/ANAFORA.v4i2.8
IEEE
B. Oklopčić, "Adapting the Adapted: The Black Rapist Myth in E.R. Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes and Its Film Adaptations", Anafora, vol.4, no. 2, pp. 313-330, 2017. [Online]. https://doi.org/10.29162/ANAFORA.v4i2.8

Abstracts
Whether in art or science, adaptation does not refer to something original but to a mutated and permutated version of a pre-existing original. In literature, adaptation occurs first when real-life stories are adapted into fiction; these fictions then often undergo a second technological adaptation as literary works are adapted into theatrical productions for stage or film. This paper explores one such doubled adaptation; it examines how the black rapist myth, which grew out of the social and cultural realities of the Jim Crow South, was transformed in E.R. Burroughs’ portrayal of Terkoz in the popular adventure novel, Tarzan of the Apes (1914), and then how this fiction was adapted into multiple and varied films between 1918 and 2016.

Keywords
Black rapist myth; white racial anxiety; Edgar Rice Burroughs; Tarzan of the Apes; popular fiction; adaptation

Hrčak ID: 192757

URI
https://hrcak.srce.hr/192757

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