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Fourteen Architectural and Planning Visions of the Historic Centre of Zadar after 1953

Antonija Mlikota ; Department of Art History, University of Zadar, Croatia

Puni tekst: hrvatski, pdf (4 MB) str. 163-192 preuzimanja: 1.044* citiraj
APA 6th Edition
Mlikota, A. (2015). Četrnaest arhitektonskih i urbanističkih vizija povijesne jezgre Zadra nastalih 1953. godine. Ars Adriatica, (5), 163-192. Preuzeto s https://hrcak.srce.hr/149682
MLA 8th Edition
Mlikota, Antonija. "Četrnaest arhitektonskih i urbanističkih vizija povijesne jezgre Zadra nastalih 1953. godine." Ars Adriatica, vol. , br. 5, 2015, str. 163-192. https://hrcak.srce.hr/149682. Citirano 11.07.2020.
Chicago 17th Edition
Mlikota, Antonija. "Četrnaest arhitektonskih i urbanističkih vizija povijesne jezgre Zadra nastalih 1953. godine." Ars Adriatica , br. 5 (2015): 163-192. https://hrcak.srce.hr/149682
Harvard
Mlikota, A. (2015). 'Četrnaest arhitektonskih i urbanističkih vizija povijesne jezgre Zadra nastalih 1953. godine', Ars Adriatica, (5), str. 163-192. Preuzeto s: https://hrcak.srce.hr/149682 (Datum pristupa: 11.07.2020.)
Vancouver
Mlikota A. Četrnaest arhitektonskih i urbanističkih vizija povijesne jezgre Zadra nastalih 1953. godine. Ars Adriatica [Internet]. 2015 [pristupljeno 11.07.2020.];(5):163-192. Dostupno na: https://hrcak.srce.hr/149682
IEEE
A. Mlikota, "Četrnaest arhitektonskih i urbanističkih vizija povijesne jezgre Zadra nastalih 1953. godine", Ars Adriatica, vol., br. 5, str. 163-192, 2015. [Online]. Dostupno na: https://hrcak.srce.hr/149682. [Citirano: 11.07.2020.]

Sažetak
The article describes the situation in Zadar after the
Second World War as one of the worst damaged towns in
Yugoslavia, which was the main reason for the creation
of the first post-war urban planning initiative and for the
involvement of the Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and
Arts, with Miroslav Krleža at the helm, in the rebuilding
of Zadar. A number of factors hindered the renovation
of the historic centre of Zadar. The slow progress and
inefficiency were caused by its reputation as an ‘Italian’
town, the exodus of the pre-war urban population and
the influx of a large number of people from the rural areas
and the islands as well as the fact that Zadar remained
officially Italian until 1947 and the overall political and
social situation. The earliest planning proposal for the
rebuilding of Zadar was made in the Ministry of Buildings
of the People’s Government of Croatia: the proposal
in 1945 and the final plan in 1946. The architects of the
new plan were Milovan Kovačević, Božidar Rašica and
Zdenko Strižić. The plan was rejected in 1948 and therefore
not applied. Since Zadar did not receive the status
of a liberated zone, it had no access to the special federal
grants for rebuilding and so, having no urban plan in
place, it was left to deteriorate. Also in 1948, Miroslav
Krleža, a well-known Croatian writer, politician and the
then deputy president of the Yugoslav Academy of Sciences
and Arts, visited Zadar. Having seen how serious
the situation was, Krleža decided to have the buildings
of the nunnery of St Mary renovated and used by the Institute
of Historic Research of the Yugoslav Academy of
Sciences and Arts. Although the project was not carried
out, it drew attention to the restoration of Zadar and encouraged
the Academy to begin producing a draft plan
for the entire urban area of Zadar as a foundation for
the Invitation to Tender Bids for the Regulatory Planning
Basis for Zadar in order to direct the development of the
town to the areas outside the historic centre in an organized
way. Due to a lack of funds and a lack of support
for the experts working in the field, in May 1952, it was
decided to advertise the call for bids without a general
draft plan and, sadly, without a regulatory framework
for the wider urban area. The Invitation to Tender Bids
for the Regulatory Basis of Urban Planning in Zadar Peninsula
and Architectural Proposals for the Historic Centre
was advertised and stipulated that all the bids be submitted
anonymously. The jury received fourteen designs,
each with a unique code, three of which were selected
as prize winners, further three were recommended for
purchase, and two designs were rejected. This paper presents
all fourteen designs and explains what happened
with the urban plan that was created by architect Bruno
Milić, one of the three prize winners, after the end of
the process in 1955. This is the first time in more than
sixty years that all of the fourteen designs are presented
together; after the tender was closed they were displayed
at the subsequent exhibitions in Zadar and Zagreb in
1954. The article also analyzes the jury’s assessment of
the proposals such as their perceived positive and negative
aspects mentioned in the reports and the reasons
why two proposals were rejected. It also examines the
jury’s decision not to award the first prize because, in
their opinion, none of the architects fulfilled the specification
criteria in full. The proposals present interesting
architectural and urban visions of the historic centre of
Zadar from 1953.

Ključne riječi
Zadar; 1953 tender; historic centre; twentieth century; architecture; protection of monuments; Miroslav Krleža

Hrčak ID: 149682

URI
https://hrcak.srce.hr/149682

[hrvatski]

Posjeta: 1.352 *