THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT HIGH-INTENSITY CONDITIONING ACTIVITIES ON SPRINT PERFORMANCE DIFFER BETWEEN SPRINTERS OF DIFFERENT STRENGTH AND POWER CHARACTERISTICS

Authors

  • Simitzi Ε. Vasiliki Department of Sports Science, City Unity College, Athens, Greece; Laboratory INSERM U887 Motricity-Plasticity, Faculty of Sport Science, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France
  • Athanasios Tsoukos Sports Performance Laboratory, School of Physical Education & Sports Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
  • Ioannis Kostikiadis Sports Performance Laboratory, School of Physical Education & Sports Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
  • Charalampos Parotsidis School of Physical Education and Sport Science, Democritus University of Thrace, Komotini, Greece
  • Christos Paizis Laboratory INSERM U887 Motricity-Plasticity, Faculty of Sport Science, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France; Performance Expertise Center, Faculty of Sport Science, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France
  • George Nassis Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Faculty of Health Sciences, SDU Sport and Health Sciences Cluster, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; School of Physical Education and Sports Training, Shanghai University of Sport, Yangpu District, Shanghai, China, 8. School of Physical Education and Sports Training, Shanghai University of Sport Yangpu District, Shanghai, China
  • Spyridon Methenitis Sports Performance Laboratory, School of Physical Education & Sports Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece; Theseus, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Center, Athens, Greece

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of different conditioning activities (CAs) on short-term increase in sprint performance. In twelve male sprinters (21.1±2.6 years, 100 m performance: 11.5±0.6 s) their body composition, half squat maximum strength, 100 m sprinting and countermovement jump performances were evaluated. The performance of a 50 m sprint (splits at 10 m, 30 m and 50 m) was evaluated before and 5, 10 and 15 min after four postactivation performance enhancement CAs on different occasions: [1] 3 sets x 4 s maximum isometric half squat (IHF), [2] 3 sets x 3 consecutive countermovement jumps (cCMJs), [3] 3 repetitions x 30 m overspeed sprinting (OVSP) and [4] dynamic submaximal half squat (2 sets x 2 reps x 90% of 1-RM half squat; HSQ). Significant improvements of sprinting performance were found 10 and 15 min following the cCMJs, OVSP and HSQ’s interventions, in all distances (p<.05; -2.14±1.21% and -3.56±2.47%), without any significant difference between these interventions and time points (p>.05). Significant inter-individual differences were found in the magnitude of sprint performance improvements as well as in the optimal time window (p<.05), with the stronger sprinters responding better after HSQs, while the more powerful sprinters after cCMJs and OVSPs. In conclusion, it seems that cCMJs, OVSP and HSQ can acutely increase sprinting performance after 10 min, but CA’s induced increases in sprinting performance are highly related to the strength and power characteristics of each sprinter.

Key words: postactivation potentiation, postactivation performance enhancement, plyometric exercises, ballistic exercises, overspeed sprinting, isometric exercises

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Published

2022-01-17

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