COMPLEX TRAINING AND COUNTERMOVEMENT JUMP PERFORMANCE ACROSS MULTIPLE SETS: EFFECT OF BACK SQUAT INTENSITY

  • Nick Poulos Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia
  • Anis Chaouachi Scientific Research Unit, Evaluation, Sport, Health, National Centre of Medicine and Science in Sports, Tunis
  • Martin Buchheit Paris Saint Germain, Saint-Germain-En-Laye
  • Denis Slimani Tunisian Research Laboratory “Sports Performance Optimisation”, National Centre of Medicine and Science in Sports (CNMSS), Tunis
  • Gregory G. Haff Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia
  • Robert U. Newton Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the acute effects of back squats on countermovement jump performance across multiple sets using a strength-power potentiation complex training protocol. Fifteen elite volleyball players performed three unloaded countermovement jumps (CMJ) following three repetitions of the back squat performed at either 65% or 87% of 1-RM, respectively, repeated for 10 sets. A control session of three CMJs was also repeated for 10 sets. Mean jump height performance was enhanced compared to performing CMJs only irrespective of which intensity was used (65% 1-RM: +3.3 ± 2.2% [CI: 1.0 to 5.6]; 87% 1-RM: 2.6 ± 1.9% [CI: 0.7 to 4.5]). Subjects with a greater relative strength possessed a very likely large (97%; ES = 1.51) chance of improvement in jump height across 10 sets of the protocol prescribed using the intensity of 87% 1-RM and a likely moderate (89%; ES = 0.94) and very likely large (97%; ES = 1.76) chance of improvement in maximum concentric impulse (N·s) using intensities of 65% and 87%1-RM, respectively. Performance (jump height and maximum concentric impulse) may be enhanced across 10 sets of the strength power potentiation complex training protocol prescribed irrespective of intensity, with a greater effect observed for the subjects with a greater relative strength and with the 87% 1-RM heavy load back squat condition. In practice, coaches should consider the athlete’s strength level when designing such a complex training protocol to generate any post-activation potentiation effect across multiple alternating sets to enhance jump performance.

Key words: complex training, postactivation potentiation, PAP, conditioning stimulus

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