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Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccines in children – a systematic review and metaanalysis

Ivana Lukšić orcid id orcid.org/0000-0002-9302-2078 ; Institute of Public Health “Dr Andrija Štampar,” Zagreb, Croatia
Sarah Clay ; Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Rachel Falconer ; Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Dražen Pulanić ; Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb Zagreb, Croatia
Igor Rudan ; Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Harry Campbell ; Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Harish Nair ; Public Health Foundation of India New Delhi, India


Puni tekst: engleski pdf 240 Kb

str. 135-145

preuzimanja: 793

citiraj


Sažetak

Aim To assess the efficacy and effectiveness of seasonal
influenza vaccines in healthy children up to the age of 18
years.
Methods MedLine, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, WHOLIS,
LILACS, and Global Health were searched for randomized
controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies investigating
the efficacy or effectiveness of influenza vaccines
in healthy children up to the age of 18 years. The studies
were assessed for their quality and data on the outcomes
of influenza-like illness, laboratory-confirmed influenza,
and hospitalizations were extracted. Seven meta-analyses
were performed for different vaccines and different study
outcomes.
Results Vaccine efficacy for live vaccines, using random
effects model, was as follows: (i) for similar antigen, using
per-protocol analysis: 83.4% (78.3%-88.8%); (ii) for similar
antigen, using intention to treat analysis: 82.5 (76.7%-
88.6%); (iii) for any antigen, using per protocol analysis:
76.4% (68.7%-85.0%); (iv) for any antigen, using intention
to treat analysis: 76.7% (68.8%-85.6%). Vaccine efficacy for
inactivated vaccines, for similar antigen, using random effects
model, was 67.3% (58.2%-77.9%). Vaccine effectiveness
against influenza-like illness for live vaccines, using
random effects model, was 31.4% (24.8%-39.6%) and using
fixed-effect model 44.3% (42.6%-45.9%). Vaccine effectiveness
against influenza-like illness for inactivated vaccines,
using random effects model, was 32.5% (20.0%-52.9%) and
using fixed-effect model 42.6% (38.3%-47.5%).
Conclusions Influenza vaccines showed high efficacy in
children, particularly live vaccines. Effectiveness was lower
and the data on hospitalizations were very limited.

Ključne riječi

Hrčak ID:

104734

URI

https://hrcak.srce.hr/104734

Datum izdavanja:

15.4.2013.

Posjeta: 1.266 *