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https://doi.org/10.3325/cmj.2013.54.192

Impact of extended course duration and stricter study organization on attrition and academic performance of medical students

Roberta Andrea Tešija ; Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia
Silvija Maslov Kružičević ; Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia
Adriana Banožić ; Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia
Carlos David Esteban ; Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia
Damir Sapunar ; Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia
Livia Puljak ; Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia


Puni tekst: engleski pdf 107 Kb

str. 192-197

preuzimanja: 739

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Sažetak

Aim To assess whether extended medical school duration,
block/modular structure of subjects, not allowing students
to transfer exams into the higher course year, and curriculum
implementation in line with the Bologna Accord are
associated with lower attrition and better academic outcomes
of medical students.
Methods We retrospectively investigated curricula at the
University of Split School of Medicine and academic outcomes
of 2301 medical students during a 33-year period
(1979-2011). The following data were obtained: grade
point average (GPA) at the end of the studies, duration
of studies, graduation on time, and whether the student
graduated or not.
Results After extension of medical curriculum from 5 to
6 years, students had significantly better grades (3.35 vs
3.68; P < 0.001), shorter study duration (7.0 vs 6.0 years;
P < 0.001), and more students graduated on time (6.5% vs
57%; P < 0.001). Changes in the 6-year curriculum, such as
stricter study regulations and adoption of Bologna Accord,
were associated with better indicators of students’ academic
success. The lowest attrition and the highest grades
during the studied period were observed after the implementation
of the Bologna Accord in 2005.
Conclusion Introduction of a longer medical curriculum,
block/modular subject structure, stricter regulations
of exam transfer, and curriculum in line with the Bologna
Accord may contribute to better academic outcomes and
lower attrition of medical students.

Ključne riječi

Hrčak ID:

104747

URI

https://hrcak.srce.hr/104747

Datum izdavanja:

15.4.2013.

Posjeta: 1.257 *