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https://doi.org/10.3325/cmj.2013.54.510

Estimating global and regional morbidity from acute bacterial meningitis in children: assessment of the evidence

Ivana Lukšić orcid id orcid.org/0000-0002-9302-2078 ; Department of Microbiology Institute of Public Health “Dr Andrija Štampar,” Zagreb, Croatia
Rosanda Mulić ; Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Split, Split, Croatia
Rachel Falconer ; Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Medical School, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Mirjana Orban ; Department of Mental Health and Drug Prevention, Institute of Public Health “Dr Andrija Štampar,” Zagreb, Croatia
Simrita Sidhu ; Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Medical School, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Igor Rudan ; Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Medical School, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK


Puni tekst: engleski pdf 967 Kb

str. 510-518

preuzimanja: 845

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Sažetak

Aim To estimate global morbidity from acute bacterial
meningitis in children.
Methods We conducted a systematic review of the PubMed
and Scopus databases to identify both community-based
and hospital registry-based studies that could be useful in
estimation of the global morbidity from bacterial meningitis
in children. We were primarily interested in the availability
and quality of the information on incidence rates and casefatality
rates. We assessed the impact of the year of study,
study design, study setting, the duration of study, and sample
size on reported incidence values, and also any association
between incidence and case-fatality rate. We also categorized
the studies by 6 World Health Organization regions
and analyzed the plausibility of estimates derived from the
current evidence using median and inter-quartile range of
the available reports in each region.
Results We found 71 studies that met the inclusion criteria.
The only two significant associations between the reported
incidence and studied covariates were the negative correlation
between the incidence and sample size (P < 0.001)
and positive correlation between incidence and case-fatality
rate (P < 0.001). The median incidence per 100 000 childyears
was highest in the African region – 143.6 (interquartile
range [IQR] 115.6-174.6), followed by Western Pacific region
with 42.9 (12.4-83.4), the Eastern Mediterranean region with
34.3 (9.9-42.0), South East Asia with 26.8 (21.0-60.3), Europe
with 20.8 (16.2-29.7), and American region with 16.6 (10.3-
33.7). The median case-fatality rate was also highest in the
African region (31.3%). Globally, the median incidence for all
71 studies was 34.0 (16.0-88.0) per 100 000 child-years, with
a median case-fatality rate of 14.4% (5.3%-26.2%).
Conclusions Our study showed that there was now sufficient
evidence to generate improved and internally consistent
estimates of the global burden of acute bacterial meningitis
in children. Although some of our region-specific
estimates are very uncertain due to scarcity of data from the
corresponding regions, the estimates of morbidity and casefatality
from childhood bacterial meningitis derived from this
study are consistent with mortality estimates derived from
multi-cause mortality studies. Both lines of evidence imply
that bacterial meningitis is a cause of 2% of all child deaths.

Ključne riječi

Hrčak ID:

117018

URI

https://hrcak.srce.hr/117018

Datum izdavanja:

15.12.2013.

Posjeta: 1.321 *