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https://doi.org/10.20471/acc.2020.59.03.01

Should We Treat Pain in the Elderly Palliative Care Cancer Patients Differently?

Marin Golčić orcid id orcid.org/0000-0002-3388-4813 ; Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Rijeka University Hospital Centre, Rijeka, Croatia
Renata Dobrila-Dintinjana ; Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Rijeka University Hospital Centre, Rijeka, Croatia
Goran Golčić ; Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Rijeka University Hospital Centre, Rijeka, Croatia
Ivana Plavšić ; Primorje-Gorski Kotar County Health Centre, Rijeka, Croatia
Lidija Gović-Golčić ; General Practice Office, Rijeka, Croatia
Berislav Belev ; Department of Oncology, Zagreb University Hospital Centre, Zagreb, Croatia
Domagoj Gajski ; Department of Neurosurgery, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Centre, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Anatomy and Physiology, University of Applied Health Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia; University of Zagreb, School of Dental Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia
Krešimir Rotim ; Department of Neurosurgery, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Centre, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Anatomy and Physiology, University of Applied Health Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia; Faculty of Medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia


Puni tekst: engleski pdf 274 Kb

str. 387-392

preuzimanja: 293

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Sažetak

Opioids are considered the cornerstone of pain management in palliative care. Available data suggest that older patients use different analgesics and lower opioid doses compared to younger patients. However, it has not been elucidated yet whether such dosing is associated with worse
pain levels or shorter survival in the palliative care setting. We evaluated the relationship among pain scores, quality of life, opioid dose, and survival in palliative care cancer patients in a hospice setting. A total of 137 palliative care cancer patients were analyzed prospectively. We divided patients into two groups using the age of 65 as a cut-off value. Younger patients exhibited significantly higher pain ratings (5.14 vs. 3.59, p=0.01), although older patients used almost 20 mg less oral morphine equivalent (OME) on arrival (p=0.36) and 55 mg OME/day less during the last week (p=0.03). There were no differences in survival between the two groups (17.36 vs. 17.58 days). The elderly patients also used nonsteroidal analgesics less often and paracetamol more often. Hence, using lower opioid doses in older palliative care cancer patients does not result in worse pain rating, and could be a plausible approach for pain management in this patient group.

Ključne riječi

Elderly patients, Hospice care, Opioids, Pain management, Palliative care

Hrčak ID:

247345

URI

https://hrcak.srce.hr/247345

Podaci na drugim jezicima: hrvatski

Posjeta: 974 *