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Original scientific paper

https://doi.org/10.37797/ig.39.3.3

Hospital infections and predominant pathogens in multidisciplinary intensive care unit in an upper middle income country

Mirko Mihalj orcid id orcid.org/0000-0003-3875-7933 ; Mostar University Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Dajana Vladić ; Mostar University Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Boris Matić ; Mostar University Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Zoran Karlović ; Mostar University Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina


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Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of hospital infections in the multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) of the Mostar University Clinical Hospital and the most common pathogenic microorganisms causing them.
Methods: This retrospective study involved patients admitted to the ICU for more than 48 hours, from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017. Blood cultures, urinary cultures and bronchial aspirate samples were used for analysis, taken 48 hours after admission to the ICU. All data were collected from the information hospital system, and descriptive statistical methods were used for the purpose of conducting the analysis.
Results: Out of 644 patients admitted to the ICU in the given period, 277 were included in our study, out of whom 70 (25.27%), with a rate of 33.3/1000 hospital days, had at least one confirmed hospital infection. Altogether 13 patients (18.57%) had an infection in two organ systems, while 5 (7.15%) patients had positive microbiological samples in three organ systems. Predominant clinical form of infections in these patients were respiratory infections (54.84%) – with a rate of 18.3/1000, then urinary tract infections (26.88%) – with a rate of 8.9/1000 and bloodstream infections (18.28%) – with a rate of 6.1/1000. Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common cause of respiratory and bloodstream infections, while urinary infections were caused mostly by Enterococcus spp and Candida albicans.
Conclusion: Hospital infections remain a major health problem that increases the morbidity and mortality of patients, especially in intensive care units and therefore, significant measures should be taken to reduce their incidence. Respiratory infections in our ICU are the most common, with higher incidence rate than in most other similar studies.

Keywords

hospital infections, critical care, etiology

Hrčak ID:

240586

URI

https://hrcak.srce.hr/240586

Article data in other languages: croatian

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