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Review article

https://doi.org/10.47960/2831-0322.2023.1.27.125

CARL GUSTAV JUNG’S THREE VIEWS OF RELIGION: RELIGIOUS SYMBOLISM AND SYNCRETISM AND MYSTICAL EXPERIENCE OF GOD AND/OR THE SELF

Maja Mandić ; Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences, Zagreb


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Abstract

In this paper we elaborate on Jung’s three theses which we consider to be the main “keys” to the understanding of Jung’s psychology of religion: the symbolism of the religious, the syncretic-eclectic view of religion, and the thesis that the “mystical unity” of the Soul and the God is the core of any true religiosity. According to Jung’s teachings, the Self represents the wholeness of other fragments of the psyche (“ego”, “shadow” and “anima and/or animus”) – and it is the ultimate aim of the “individuation process”. The mystical (Numinous, Sacred) manifests and expresses itself through the “collective subconsciousness”, and through individual symbols and archetypes. According to Jung’s teaching, God manifests himself in many different languages – these “languages” (or ways of participation with Divine) all are equally valuable. One finds God and is connected with him inside himself, in the depths of his interior – such God is called by Jung “inner God”. Moreover, “experience of inner God” and “experience of the Self ” (Self – as the inner wholeness assimilated with Absolute) – are equivalent experiences. Christian thought can accept Jungian concept of religiosity only partially, because some of Jung’s notions contradict the Christian doctrines.

Keywords

symbol; archetype; Self; Individuation; religion; mysticism; “inner God”; symbolism; syncretism; “mystical unity”

Hrčak ID:

306289

URI

https://hrcak.srce.hr/306289

Publication date:

13.7.2023.

Article data in other languages: croatian

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